Register / Log In

EHR user satisfaction decreasing, according to study


Satisfaction and usability ratings for certified electronic health records (EHRs) have decreased since 2010 among clinicians across a range of indicators, according to survey results released by the American College of Physicians (ACP) and AmericanEHR Partners in a presentation, “Challenges with Meaningful Use: EHR Satisfaction & Usability Diminishing,” at the 2013 HIMSS Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans.

Overall, user satisfaction fell 12% from 2010 to 2012. Users who are “very dissatisfied” increased 10% during the same time period.

“Dissatisfaction is increasing regardless of practice type or EHR system,” says Michael S. Barr, MD, MBA, FACP, who leads the ACP's medical practice, professionalism and quality division. “These findings highlight the need for the meaningful use program and EHR manufacturers to focus on improving EHR features and usability to help reduce inefficient work flows, improve error rates and patient care, and for practices to recognize the importance of ongoing training at all stages of EHR adoption.”

The findings are from 4,279 responses to multiple surveys developed and analyzed by ACP and AmericanEHR Partners between March 2010 and December 2012. Of the clinicians who responded to the surveys, 71% were in practices of 10 or fewer physicians, and 82% of respondents intend to participate in meaningful use incentive programs, up from 65% in 2010.

Additional key findings from the surveys:

  • The percentage of clinicians who would not recommend their EHR to a colleague increased from 24% in 2010 to 39% in 2012.

  • Clinicians who were “very satisfied” with the ability for their EHR to improve care dropped by 6% compared with 2010, whereas those who were “very dissatisfied” increased 10%. (Surgical specialists were the least satisfied group. Primary care physicians were more satisfied than medical subspecialists.)

  • 34% of users were “very dissatisfied” with the ability of their EHR to decrease workload, an increase from 19% in 2010.

  • Survey responses also indicated that it is becoming more difficult to return to pre-EHR implementation productivity. In 2012, 32 percent of the responders had not returned to normal productivity compared with 20% in 2010.

  • Dissatisfaction with ease of use increased from 23% in 2010 to 37% in 2012, while satisfaction with ease of use dropped from 61% to 48%.

More findings based on the surveys are available at www.americanehr.com.

AmericanEHR Partners provides comprehensive information to support clinicians in the selection and use of EHRs to improve health care delivery. It was founded by ACP and Cientis Technologies.

 


 

Follow Medical Economics on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

RELATED CONTENT

PCPs happier with EHRs than specialists

EHRs: 6 factors in physician satisfaction

 

A majority of healthcare leaders report that they have qualified for meaningful use stage one, according to results from the 24th Annual Health Information and Management Systems Society Leadership Survey.

The stand-alone fee-for-service payment could disappear by the end of the decade if a plan newly released by the National Commission on Physician Payment Reform is followed.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s ability to protect individuals from preventable infectious diseases is likely to be hampered by sequestration, and analysts from research and consulting firm GlobalData argue that the cuts ultimately will fail to accomplish the goal of decreasing federal spending.

Physician groups are among the many voices chiding federal lawmakers for their failure to avert billions of dollars in arbitrary spending cuts that will result in a cut to Medicare reimbursements.

Breakdowns in the physician-patient encounter, most notably "cognitive errors" by doctors, are the most frequent causes of diagnostic errors in the primary care setting.