Practice Management

Your best malpractice defenses
Your best malpractice defensesPrepare yourself for the potential of malpractice cases by maintaining good relationships with your patients and by following thorough rules.
Type 2 Diabetes: Key coding considerationsWhile most physicians may use only one or two codes, it is important to code properly to reflect the condition accurately and ensure appropriate reimbursement
Managing Type 2 Diabetes: How to reach your patientsCurrently, more than 29 million Americans have diabetes. Follow these patient management tips to help control costs and treat patients.

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Getting paid: Strategies and best practicesIn the current medical practice landscape, physicians are increasingly frustrated when it comes to the issue of payment for the care they provide. Doctors and their staff members often find themselves chasing patients and insurance companies to get paid, and frequently are forced to write off bills that could and should be paid.
Dealing with Dr. Google: Why communication is keyWhen patients visit your office, they may already have a diagnosis in mind. Google says that one of every 20 searches on its search engine are conducted to obtain health-related information. With that in mind, how can a primary care physician (PCP) win a patient’s trust and resolve conflicts if the patient wants tests or treatments that the physician believes are unnecessary?
The ethics of researching patients on the webLittle guidance is available to help physicians determine how finding information about a patient online may affect the relationship with the patient.

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From the other side: Physician writing contest third place entryMedical Economics is proud to unveil the third-place entry in our 2015 Physician Writing Contest.
Talking treatment costs: Navigating financial discussions with patientsWhat role should physicians play in discussing the financial impact of treatment decisions, and how can they better manage these conversations?
What's the verdict: A case of changing medical recordsA step-by-step examination of a malpractice suit in which a patient claims to be suffering from multiple myeloma and asked for opioids. When it is revealed the patient lied about the need for opioids, the physician assistant changed the medical records before a lawsuit.
Lessons learned: One physician's malpractice experienceEdward Zurad, MD, FAAFP, a solo family practitioner in rural Pennsylvania, found himself one of four defendants in a medical malpractice lawsuit. The plaintiff was not one of Zurad's regular patients. The case was not settled out of court. Zurad shares his experience in being sued and being acquitted by a jury.

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